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Part 3-4 The Kitchen Flooring

Have you wondered what type of Kitchen Flooring you should use?

I get asked about my thoughts on kitchen flooring all the time from my clients that are either renovating or building new. I may be old school, but for me, if any water is involved ie: sink, dishwasher, refrigerator with water or ice hookup etc. I want to see a waterproof membrane over the substrate and flooring that is water resistant like tile or luxury vinyl on top.

    

We have recently ‘right-sized’ our life and are attempting to make an ‘Age in Place’ home but with a ‘Resort Style’ feel. The only thing I hated was our kitchen. However, the previous owners did put gorgeous Italian porcelain tile on the floor but installed the cabinets first and then tiled up to them.

This is an ABSOLUTE No No because if you are updating the kitchen now you have to use the floor’s template or replace the entire floor and risk damaging the in-floor heating system!

However, you can still work around that issue.

I redesigned our kitchen and kept the current floor space as it was along with the beautiful tile floor (which went with the rest of the Spanish/Italian house design. I simply increased the size of the island to include a breakfast bar and moved the fridge/freezer and storage to the other unutilized wall. You can CLICK on the finished photo above to see the before and after.

              

Kitchen Flooring is an important aspect of interior design as it literally is the ‘ground’ that we walk on indoors. It deserves special consideration including the substrate that is under it – plywood or concrete.

In-floor radiant heating is a wonderful feature especially if you have tile flooring though you should be aware of a few things like:

FYI: heat does not radiate through at the same temperature under insulated hardwood floor plus, you need to ensure that you select the ‘right hardwood’ to be installed over in-floor heating or your warranty may be void due to shrinking or cracking of the wood. Therefore, only certain engineered hardwood floors and laminates can go over in-floor heating but solid hardwood cannot due to its inherent properties.

Yes, many show homes and interior design magazine photos show beautiful kitchens with hardwood floors. They are stunning and make the space look bigger because there is no break in flooring material.

Nonetheless, I personally don’t like them for the ‘possible problems’ that can take place unless you live alone and have full control of what goes on in that space. I always recommend the ‘hardwood-look tile’ flooring that has become popular over the last few years.

My only concern is making sure that the edge of the tile has its colour go right through or has a straight cut edge because grout colour will be placed next to it. For hardwood-looking tile, you also want rectified tile which is precisely cut tile to ensure a small ¼” grout line.

Check out this website The Spruce for more info on tile types for kitchen floors.

In conclusion, the ‘Age in Place’ kitchen flooring should make this space look cohesive in colour and style to the rest of the home and have no transition heights between the areas. It should also be low maintenance, slip resistance and warm where you stand the most. Utilize radiant floor heating or heat mats to achieve this. They aren’t as expensive as you think and the comfort you get outweighs the cost. Also, because tile is harder to stand on, an anti-fatigue rug in front of the sink and/or where you stand the most would be advisable. Of course, if you are in a wheelchair this doesn’t apply.

Hopefully, this info has helped you narrow down the right flooring decision for your ‘Resort Style’ home!

Simply me by Design,
Jan Addams Designer, Author, Trainer

   

 

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Part 1-4 of Age in Place KITCHEN Appliances

Hi Fellow Baby Boomers!
In the last blog post, I talked about Aging in Place – Resort Style ENTRANCES where I discussed
The ‘8’ AGE in PLACE – RESORT STYLE Features:

  1. High curb appeal exterior design
  2. Easy care driveway (non-slip stamped concrete, exposed aggregate, brick) with turn around
  3. Remote door opener in garage with no post divider
  4. Low maintenance Exterior including stucco, brick, stone or smart board siding (no paint)
  5. Easy sight line into home for security
  6. Security System or ‘motion lights’ – crooks don’t like bright lights or dogs 🙂
  7. Low maintenance yard with underground sprinkler system
  8. No threshold entrance with built in gentle slope that acts as a ramp

 

 

 

 

This week we are going ‘inside’ to the ‘Heart of the Home’ the KITCHEN.

Let’s start with the ‘Work Triangle’:

  • No leg of the triangle should be less than 4 feet (1.2 m) or more than 9 feet (2.7 m).
  • The sum of all three sides of the triangle should be between 13 feet (4.0 m) and 26 feet (7.9 m).
  • Cabinets or other obstacles should not intersect any leg of the triangle by more than 12 inches (30 cm).
  • If possible, there should be no major traffic flow through the triangle.
  • A full-height obstacle, such as a tall cabinet, should not come between any two points of the triangle.

Besides the work triangle itself, there are several rules of thumb to consider when planning a kitchen:

  • As measured between countertops and cabinets or appliances, work aisles should be no less than 42 inches (110 cm) for one cook, or 48 inches (120 cm) for multiple cooks.
  • A sink should have a clear counter area of at least 24 inches (61 cm) on one side, and at least 18 inches (46 cm) on the other side.
  • At least 36 inches (91 cm) of food preparation area should be located next to the sink.
  • A refrigerator should have a clear counter area of at least 15 inches (38 cm) on the handle side, or the same on either side of a side-by-side refrigerator; or the same area on a counter no more than 48 inches (120 cm) across from the refrigerator.
  • A stove or cooktop should have a clear 15 inches (38 cm) area on one side, and at least 12 inches (30 cm) on the other side.
  • In a seating area where no traffic passes behind the diner, allow 32 inches (81 cm) from the wall to the edge of the table or counter; if traffic passes behind the diner, allow 44 inches (110 cm).

CLICK HERE to get Jan’s 8 BEST TIPS for selecting Appliances and Plumbing Fixtures

Part 1 of 4: APPLIANCES & PLUMBING:

With all my clients looking to renovate or build new I have them choose their appliances and plumbing first. This is the types of appliances both major > fridge, freezer, range, ovens, dishwasher; to the smaller but still costly ones such as microwaves, espresso machines etc.  that you want, need and can afford in your Kitchen.  This is your biggest cost and can make or break your budget.

Appliances:

  • Stove – $500 – $6000.00
  • Hood Fans – $250 – $6000.00
  • Ovens – $250 – $4000.00
  • Fridge – $500 – $40,000.00
  • Freezer – $500 – $30,000.00
  • Dishwasher – $450 – $3000.00

Consider the following 4 of 8 things when choosing your cooking appliance:

  1. How much space do you have and what is your budget range?
  2. Who is the main cook in the family?
  3. What type of food do you cook and how frequently?
  4. Do you need a separate oven, double ovens or an all in one style?

CLICK HERE to get ALL Jan’s 8 BEST TIPS for selecting Appliances 

Look for the following 4 of 8 items when selecting your Fridge / Freezer:

  1. How much space do you have – width (24, 30, 33, 36, 42, 48”) and depth (full or counter)?
  2. What is your budget range?
  3. What type of refrigerator do you like – full fridge; freezer top or bottom; side by side; French door; door within the door; water and ice machine (inside or outside) remember cubic feet of storage gets eaten up when you have an icemaker.
  4. How much fresh food (fruits, vegetables, dairy) do you store in the fridge?

Plumbing:

  • Dishwasher – $450 – $3000.00
  • Sink (Main) – $200 – 3000.00
  • Bar Sink – $100 – $1000.00
  • Faucet (Main)- $250 – 700.00
  • Faucet (Hot / Cold) – $500 – $1500
  • Cooktop pasta faucet – $200 – $2200

CLICK HERE to get ALL Jan’s 8 BEST TIPS for selecting Appliance &  PLUMBING Fixtures

Look for the following 4 of 8 items when selecting your Dishwasher and Plumbing fixtures:

  1. Do you have an open floor plan – select a quiet dishwasher?
  2. Do you like to easily access the controls or prefer them hidden?
  3. Do you want a dishwasher that blends into the cabinetry (panel ready – limited items)?
  4. Do you want a full dishwasher or the new ‘drawer style’ dishwasher?
  5. Consider how you use your sink – pots, pans, and roasters require a large sink. I suggest a ‘smart divide’ or ‘low divide’ sink be able to easily wash and rinse all items.

As with any and all items you may purchase research is key.  Check out websites that rate appliances for you like http://www.reviews.com/